The Yusuf Trilogy

The Yusuf trilogy is an intriguing feat of Turkish cinema Taking his cue from psychoanalysis, Kaplanoğlu portrays the microcosm of one man and his world.

Cannes Film Festival 2011 Round-Up

Round-up by Eftihia Stefanidi Closing on 22 May, Cannes 2011 was one to remember and though Cannes’ milieu may appear frivolous, tasteless and absurd from…

Humanity’s Unspoken Rhetoric: rAndom International, Wellcome Collection, London.

Review by Sarah Richter, a candidate for the MA in Art History at Richmond the American International University in London. Decorating Euston Road in the…

Filmmaker Series – Part 4 Q&A with Daniel Wirtberg

Filmmaker Series – Part 4 Q&A with Daniel Wirtberg For the fourth instalment in our Q&A series with last year’s Aesthetica Short Film Competition winners…

Articulating Sounds As Visual Imagery: Sam Belinfante, Penumbra, mima, Middlesborough

Review by Jareh Das As you approach mima (Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art) in Centre Square the viewer is confronted by a resounding female operatic…

Predominantly Political Art? Peter Kennard, At Earth, Raven Row, London

Review by Kara Magid, a candidate for the MA in Art History at Richmond, The American International University in London. Painters George Shaw and Karla…

Francis Alÿs: A Story of Deception, MoMA, New York.

Francis Alÿs: A Story of Deception at The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1 opens on 8 May, drawing upon MoMA’s unique and important…

The Post-Photographic Era: Alastair Cook, Analogue Decay, Howden Park Centre

Review by Colin Herd The names of difficult-to-get-hold-of and in some cases discontinued-altogether photographic film have something of the poetry of a catalogue of obscure…

The Interaction between Classical Music, Theatre and Film: Michel van der Aa, Barbican, London

Review by Nathan Breeze Touring six major European culture halls, Liebestod was a cross-genre performance by the Amsterdam Sinfonietta exploring the interaction between Classical Music…

UK Film: Global Stage

The UK Film industry has taken a few major blows recently. In the face of this, British films are being picked up by overseas film festivals: next stop, Tribeca.

On a Road to Nowhere

Across the Atlantic there’s a strong tradition of road trip films, the bulk of the action based in or around the car and the endless dusty highway ahead.

Leap Year

Leap Year delivers an emotional and graphic examination of loneliness through the listless life of journalist Laura.

Bella

Bella is a beautifully shot film, and has a narrative that viewers will relate to, easy to watch because of its deep exploration of personal choice.

Slingshot

Slingshot follows a group of petty criminals or “tiradors” (in local slang), in a slum neighbourhood in Manila.

Catfish

By turns sinister and tragic, Catfish makes use of the various social mediums and communications that replace face-to-face contact in the modern world.

Open House

When Alice is imprisoned in her own house by the psychotic David, it isn’t long before David develops a misguided relationship with his prisoner.

I’m Still Here

I’m Still Here is the directorial debut of Oscar-nominated actor Casey Affleck, a bizarre portrayal of a year in the life of acclaimed actor Joaquin Phoenix.

Birds Eye View

Birds Eye View’s Rachel Millward talks about how their popular film festival applauds the creativity and brilliance of women in film.

Patagonia

Marc Evans’ latest film, Patagonia, looks at the idea of homeland, history and belonging through a parallel narrative.

Make Your Film: Part Two

How to get your film out there: Elliot Grove, founder of Raindance Festival, offers top tips to help promote your film.